June Giveaway 2021

Do you have a favourite Canadian historic place?

Submit a photograph you took of a historic place and what it means to you to be entered to win one of 28 prizes from National Geographic, The Walrus, and more!

The contest starts on June 1st and runs till June 30th, 2021. We will begin drawing prizes on June 15th.

Good luck!

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Previous Contest Entries 

Thanks to all those who shared their stories this year. Here are just a few of the many contributions that show how historic places touch our lives in diverse ways.

“In 2019, my wife and I were in Baddeck, NS, and visited the Alexander Graham Bell Historic Site and museum. It was fascinating, and it reminded us that in all the years that we had lived in southern Ontario, we had never visited the Bell Homestead in Brantford. On a warm August day that summer, we toured the Homestead for the first time. It was very well presented, and added to my knowledge and interest in Alexander Graham Bell. And, we were the only visitors in the house that day — a bonus. The guide was informative, and we enjoyed learning more about Bell’s early years in our neighbourhood.”

– Richard, Waterloo, ON

“Last week I took my 5 teenage nephews for a hike to Plain of Six Glaciers Tea House at Lake Louise Alberta, during our camping trip. I am so proud of them for completing their first mountain hike. What this magical place taught us during our hike is: accomplishment, looking deeply to see the beauty that surrounded us, helping others overcoming fear, perseverance, how hiking can help youth to conquer self imposed limits and teamwork. What this place means to me – family fun and that I need to return with my pencils and sketch book to capture the physical beauty of a cherished memory.”

– Lisa, White Rock, BC

“The Orangedale station was once the hub of a small community. Built in 1886, it’s the last surviving wooden Intercolonial Railaway station on Cape Breton Island. But to me, it was a playground. In the summer, we’d race down the dirt road to peek through the tall glass windows, and marvel at the ancient curved staircase that led upstairs. In the evening we’d wander down the tracks, balancing carefully on the rails. The station was closed in the 1990’s, and is now a magical museum. The tracks are now partially covered with grass, but we still walk down them, and listen to the crickets.”

– Janet, Toronto, ON

Prize Sponsors

We were lucky to call the following organizations our prize sponsors for #HistoricPlacesDays 2021.